MartialInfo

martial art styles in Okinawa



Karate; Karate-Jutsu; Te; To-De; To-Te

Bugeikan 

Gensei-ryu 

Hakutsuru-te; Hakutsuru-ken 

Ishimine-ryu 

Isshin-ryu one heart way

Itato-ryu 

Jodo 

Kojo-ryu 

Kushin Ryu 

Matsubayashi-Ryu Karate 

Motobu-ryu 

Naha-te; Shorei-ryu 

Okinawan Kempo 

Ryu-te Ryu-te (Japanese: 琉手 Hepburn: Ryūte?) is an Okinawan martial art founded by Seiyu Oyata (親田清勇 Oyata Seiyū?).[1] The word Ryu-te is actually an acronym meaning "Ryukyu Hand" with Ryukyu being a reference to the original name of Okinawa prior to it becoming part of Japan.[2] Before 1995, Oyata referred to his style as Ryukyu Kempo,[3][4] but eventually renamed it "Ryu-te" as Ryukyu Kempo was a reference to all styles originating in Okinawa rather than to any one particular style. Ryu-te emphasizes effective self-defense while deliberately minimizing the harm to the opponent[5][6] Its practitioners consider Ryu-te neither a sport nor a form of exercise, but rather a method of training the body and mind for the betterment of mankind.
Technically, Ryu-te is characterized by combining joint manipulation techniques (tuite jutsu) with effective strikes to the body's weak points (kyusho jutsu).These terms, which have become well known among martial artists, were originally introduced to the United States by Oyata in the early-1980s.
Unlike many styles of martial arts which are derived from publicly taught styles popularized by notable practitioners such as Gichin Funakoshi, Ankō Itosu, Sokon Matsumura and Tode Sakugawa, Ryu-te is principally derived from private, family styles. Oyata first learned Okinawan weapons (kobudo) from Uhugushiku, a bushi and retired palace guard. He also studied with Wakinaguri, whose family was descended from the Chinese families who emigrated to Ryukyu during the Ming Dynasty. Ryu-te is also influenced by Shigeru Nakamura's Okinawan Kenpo, as Oyata was a member of the Okinawa Kenpo Karate Kobudo Federation from the time of Uhugushiku and Wakinaguri's passing until Nakamura's death in 1968.

Ryuei-ryu; Ryu-Ei-ryu 

Seidokan 

Shorin-ryu 

Shorinji-ryu 

Shuri-te 

Tomari-te 

Toon-ryu 

Toyama-ryu 

Tozan-ryu 

Kobu-Jutsu; Ryukyukobu-Jutsu

Kobudo; Te-Gua

Honshin-ryu 

Matayoshi Kobudo 

Ryukyu Kobudo 

Uhuchiku Kobudo 

Yamani-ryu; Yamane-ryu 

Kyusho-Jutsu

Okinawa-Te

Tegumi

Toide

Tuite

Ufuchiku Kobu-Jutsu

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